Kingsport City Schools

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School Nurse Notes

immunizations

The Tennessee School Immunization Certificate serves as verification that all immunizations are up to date and the child is eligible for school enrollment. This certificate also verifies that the child has completed a health examination (which is required for each child initially entering a Tennessee school).

The Tennessee School Immunization Certificate may be completed by any health department office in Tennessee or your child’s healthcare provider. No child can attend school in Tennessee without this documentation per state law TCA 49-6-(5001-5005). Kingsport City Schools accepts physical examinations completed up to 366 days prior to the date of enrollment.

 

Children Entering Pre-K:

  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib): age younger than 5 years only
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV): age younger than 5 years only
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (1 dose of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (1 dose or history of disease)
  • Hepatitis A (1 dose by 18 months of age)
 
Children Entering Kindergarten:
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease)
  • Hepatitis A (2 doses)
 
ALL Children Entering 7th Grade (including currently enrolled students):
  • Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis booster (“Tdap”)
  • Verification of immunity to varicella (2 doses or history of disease)
 
Children who are new enrollees in a TN school in grades other than Kindergarten or 7th Grade:
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV): previously only for Kindergarten, 7th grade entry
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required
  • Tennessee Department of Health Certificate Of Immunization
 
Children with medial or religious exemption to requirements:
  • Medical: Healthcare provider must indicate which specific vaccines are medically exempted (because of risk of harm) on the new form. Other vaccines remain required.
  • Religious: Requires only a signed statement by the parent/guardian that vaccination conflicts with their religious tenets or practices. If documentation of a health examination is required, it must be noted by the health care provider on the immunization certificate. In that case, the provider may explain the absence of immunization information by checking that the parent has obtained a religious exemption. 

meningococcal vaccine

Meningococcal disease is a serious illness, caused by bacteria. Meningitis may cause mental retardation, loss of limbs or even death. State law requires school systems to inform parents/guardians of the risks of Meningitis and the wide availability of vaccines. The vaccine is recommended at age 11-12 and may be obtained at your physician’s office or the county health department.
 
Students will be excluded from school until proof of immunization or the appropriate exemption is received. 

should your child be kept home from school? 

The following information outlines when students should or should not stay home from school.
 
  • Chicken Pox:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children with uncomplicated chicken pox may return after he/she is fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications and after all blisters have dry, complete scabs.  This is usually seven (7) days from the beginning of the breakout with the pox.

  • Childhood Contagious Disease:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children should stay home from school (until advised by provider) if there is a suspicion of any childhood contagious disease such as measles, mumps, rubella or chicken pox.

  • Cold (Upper Respiratory Illness):

(With mild symptoms such as stuffy nose with clear drainage, sneezing, and mild cough.)

Should you keep your child home from school?

No.  Your child may attend school if he or she is able to participate in school activities and fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.  The fever should be less than 101 unless the child is less than six (6) months of age and the fever should be less than 100. 

  • Conjunctivitis (Pink-Eye):

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Students may return twenty-four (24) hours after treatment is started and signs and symptoms of eye drainage are greatly reduced.

  • Cough:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  You should keep your child home if cough is present with fever [101 degrees or more unless the child is less than six (6) months of age and the fever should be less than 100 degrees to attend school].  You should keep your child home if he/she has a cough with shortness of breath or if coupled with thick or constant nasal drainage.

  • Diarrhea:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  You should keep your child home from school as long as diarrhea is present.  If the child has been diagnosed by the provider with a non-infectious disease that causes diarrhea, the child may attend school. 

  • Ear Infection:

Should your child be kept home from school?

No.  Your child may attend if there is no fever.

  • Fever:

Should your child be kept home from school?

Yes.  The child should stay home if his/her temperature is 101 degrees or more unless the child is less than six (6) months of age and the fever should be less than 100 degrees to attend school.  Keep child home until fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.

  • Fever Blister:

Should your child be kept home from school?

Yes.  The child should stay home if mouth sore is present. The child should stay home until sore starts to heal producing scab.

  • Fifth Disease:

Should you keep your child home from school?

No.  By the time the rash appears, children are no longer contagious and do not need to stay home.  Keep students home until fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.

  • Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return to school when all lesions are dry.  In addition, keep students home until fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.

  • Head Lice:

Should you keep your child home from school?

No.  Children may return to class after treatment and approval from school nurse.
  • Impetigo:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return to school twenty-four (24) hours after treatment starts.  Sores should be covered when the child returns to school.

  • Rash:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return to school after seen and diagnosed by provider.  Provider will instruct when child may return to school.

  • Ringworm:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return to school twenty-four (24) hours after treatment begins.  Areas should be covered when the child returns to school.

  • Scabies:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return to school after treatment has been started.

  • Staph:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes. Children should be kept home from school until seen by provider and advised regarding appropriate treatment.

  • Strep Throat:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return twenty-four (24) hours after antibiotics have been started and when fever free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.

  • Stye:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  Children may return after treatment has been started.  Warm compresses may be applied to the affected area.  Practice good hand hygiene.

  • Vomiting:

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes.  A child should be kept at home until vomiting ceased after he/she is fever-free for twenty-four (24) hours without the use of fever controlling medications.

  • Whooping Cough (Pertussis):

Should you keep your child home from school?

Yes. Children should be kept at home until after treated and advised to return by provider.

 
Please note that a provider’s written instructions to the school will take precedence over the above guidelines.  If you should have specific questions regarding your child, please contact the school nurse.

parent contact information

If your child becomes ill or has an emergency, it is important that we be able to reach you. Please make sure that the school has an accurate telephone number(s) listed for you.  This will enable the school to contact you in the event that your child needs you during the school day. Please remember to send new work telephone numbers to school if you change jobs and update cell phone numbers that change.

medications

Kingsport City Schools provide a licensed and/or registered medical professional at every school. All medications, prescription or over-the-counter, are to be administered or assistance given with self-administration by school personnel. Students requiring exceptions (i.e. inhalers, insulin, epi-pens, etc.) are documented with the school nurse and follow KCS School Nursing Procedures. The schools provide parents/guardians with the forms and procedures to use when students require medication. Any questions regarding medication procedures should be directed to the school office or clinic.
Contact Us!
 
Kingsport City Schools Student Health Services Department
400 Clinchfield Street, Ste. 200
Kingsport, TN 37660
 
Ph: (423) 378.2110
Fax: (423) 378.2120